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Wynn Hotel Atrium Show

this as my first experience to the Wynn and it was a treat.

We ended up going for a drink and stumbled across this “lounge” surrounded by a lake. We were quite proud of our little find, how ever our discovery was about to get a whole lot more grand.

Unknown to us, suddenly this amazing song, light and video production began. To see it in person is the only way to view it. This video in no way does it justice.

This video was taken ten years ago so I am sure this “show” does not exist any more, however I do know that this “lake” still exists and they have a new updated show.

In regards to my other experiences here at the Wynn, I found their buffet to be one of the best on the strip!

South Jetty of the Columbia River

The Mouth of the Columbia River’s jetty system was constructed between 1885 and 1939. The system consists of three rubble-mound jetties: North Jetty, South Jetty and Jetty A. Constructed on massive tidal shoals and totaling 9.7 miles in length, the jetties minimize navigation channel maintenance and make passage safer for vessels transiting between the Pacific Ocean and the Columbia River.

Shipwreck

Peter Iredale was a four-masted steel barque sailing vessel that ran ashore October 25, 1906, on the Oregon coast en route to the Columbia River. She was abandoned on Clatsop Spit near Fort Stevens in Warrenton about four miles (6 km) south of the Columbia River channel. Wreckage is still visible, making it a popular tourist attraction as one of the most accessible shipwrecks of the Graveyard of the Pacific.

Wikipedia